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Geneoscopy is noninvasively diagnosing colorectal cancer

by Erica Barnell, B.S. (MD/PhD Student)

Geneoscopy is eliminating the need for unnecessary colonoscopies by providing patients with a noninvasive method that evaluates stool samples for colorectal cancer.

Saint Louis, MO Medical Device

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About this project

The problem we solve:
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in both men and women. In 2014, 136,000 patients were diagnosed with CRC and over 50,000 patients died from the disease. Despite the fact that all men and women over the age of 50 are recommended to receive a screening colonoscopy once every 10 years, the CDC estimates that only 58.2% of individuals were compliant with screening recommendations as of 2013. Low compliance with preventive screening results in late-stage detection of the cancer, which reduces the five-year survival rate from 90% to only 11%. Existing screening methodologies are flawed for a variety of reasons. Colonoscopies, currently considered the gold standard in identifying the presence of CRC, are incredibly invasive, expensive and time consuming. While noninvasive methods, such as DNA tests and fecal occult blood tests, do exist, they are largely unreliable due to low sensitivity rates and the inability to detect precancerous changes.

About our solution:
Geneoscopy has developed a method to evaluate the human expression profiles of stool samples to improve colorectal cancer detection. Researchers have previously been unable to use biomarkers from human cells in stool samples because these signals are heavily degraded and overrun by bacterial noise. However, Geneoscopy has developed a novel and proprietary technology to amplify these signals. This allows Geneoscopy to detect the presence or absence of CRC and recommend a course of therapy based on the size, stage and location of the cancer. Our advanced extraction method is incredibly sensitive, and when used in combination with a high-resolution library analysis, we are able to detect even minor changes in gene expression. The result is a test that significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of noninvasive screening and detection for CRC.
Progress to date: In 2015, Geneoscopy raised $20,000 from its founding members and was awarded $2,600 of non-dilutive funding. The company used this money to fund its initial, 12-patient pilot study, which was completed in February 2016 and validated Geneoscopy's technological platform. Within the last several months, Geneoscopy has been awarded $60,000 in additional non-dilutive funding, and is dedicating this money to a 400-patient trial this summer which is expected to validate the sensitivity and specificity of Geneoscopy's test.

About Our Team


Ms. Erica Barnell, B.S. (MD/PhD Student)
Medical Student, Medical Student
Medical school: Washington University School of Medicine
Bio: Erica Barnell was born in St. Louis, Missouri where she graduated John Burroughs School in 2009. She then obtained her B.S. as a dual major in Biological Sciences and Applied Economics & Management from Cornell University. Currently, she is finishing her second year as an MD/PhD student at the Washington University School of Medicine. In 2015, Erica founded Geneoscopy, a company developing a technology to noninvasively diagnose colorectal cancer using biomarkers in stool samples.
Title: CEO
LinkedIn: erica-barnell-72b16a60

About Team Members

Andrew Barnell
Chief Financial Officer, MBA
Biography: Andrew Barnell majored in Applied Economics & Management with a concentration in Finance at Cornell University. He worked as an analyst in healthcare investment banking at J.P. Morgan for two years and as an associate at Lindsay Goldberg for an additional two years in New York City. Currently, he is an MBA candidate at The Wharton School in Philadelphia.
Yiming Kang
Chief Technology Officer, PhD in Computer Sciences
Biography: Yiming is currently an NIH GATP Fellow at Washington University in St. Louis developing a gene regulatory network in diverse eukaryotic species using machine learning and statistical inference algorithms.

About Our Company


Geneoscopy LLC
Location: Saint Louis, Missouri
Website: http://www.geneoscopy.com
Twitter: GeneoscopyLLC
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Geneoscopy-1088467174505291/
Product stage: proto
Sales: Less than $250,000
Employees: 3-5

How We Help Patients

1 in 3 patients who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer will die from the disease. This high mortality rate is not due to the aggressiveness of the cancer, but rather due to the indolent progression of a cancer that is left undetected. Geneoscopy provides a better way for patients to detect colorectal cancer and will prevent the millions of unnecessary colonoscopies in the process. A vote for Geneoscopy means that you might never require a preventive screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer!

How We Help Physicians

A Geneoscopy test once every 4 years would filter out patients with no significant risk for polyps or CRC, thereby eliminating up to 70% of unnecessary colonoscopies. By reducing the number of preventive colonoscopies, GIs can focus their time on removing cancer, not testing for it. Given low expected growth in the number of providers and long backlogs of patients to scope, freeing up GIs to work on higher acuity cases will be especially important as compliance with screening increases and systemic focus shifts to value-based medicine. Early detection of the disease, driven by increased compliance and higher frequency of testing, will also drive down the treatment costs for CRC. Studies estimate that the lifetime savings associated with early diagnosis of CRC can be as high as $90,000 per patient. With over 70,000 late-stage diagnoses in 2014 alone, the potential for cost reduction is substantial.

Challenge Mission

Mission: Colorectal cancer is the most preventable, but least prevented cancer due to low screening compliance. Geneoscopy's mission is to eliminate all deaths resultsing from late-stage detection of CRC
Use of funds: Geneoscopy expects to launch its 400-patient validation study in the summer of 2016. In conjunction with its validation study, Geneoscopy will also incur legal and regulatory expenses. To fund this study, Geneoscopy has already raised $60,000 (24% of the total). Any funds received from The AMA Healthier Nation Innovation Challenge would be dedicated to this study.
Intellectual Property Status: Geneoscopy filed a utility patent on April 29th, 2016, which covers three claims; 1) enhanced purification of degraded biomarkers in stool samples 2) a specific set of biomarkers correlated with CRC, and 3) an algorithm for disease diagnosis.
FDA Status: Geneoscopy expects to begin its pre-market approval study at the beginning of 2017. Geneoscopy believes that this study will take 12-18 months, and will require prospective data from 10,000 patients. Based on FDA approval trials for similar companies, Geneoscopy expects that this study will cost $10 million. Geneoscopy expects to raise this money in one large round from institutional investors and/or strategics in the colon cancer arena.
Personal Message: Geneoscopy will be the first diagnostic technology to combine the accuracy of a colonoscopy with the noninvasive nature of a fecal DNA or blood test. We will eliminate unnecessary colonoscopies and prevent mortality associated with a late-stage cancer diagnosis. We are addressing the needs of healthcare by providing patients with an affordable, accurate, and easy to use test to eliminate the world's most preventable, but least prevented cancer.

Supporters

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    12/12/2016 lise wolfe - Concerned Citizen

    Interested in trying the project.

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    12/12/2016 lise wolfe - Concerned Citizen

    Followed the project.

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    05/21/2016 KARTHIK SARMA - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    05/20/2016 Ms. Erica Barnell - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    05/19/2016 Justin Newman - Healthcare Innovator

    Followed the project.

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    05/17/2016 Annelise Mah - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    05/17/2016 Annelise Mah - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/17/2016 Yiming Kang - Engineer

    Followed the project.

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    05/17/2016 Yiming Kang - Engineer

    Liked the project.

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    05/17/2016 Huy Lam - Entrepeneur

    Liked the project.

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    05/12/2016 John Ekman - Medical Student

    Interested in trying the project.

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    05/12/2016 John Ekman - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/10/2016 Christine Averill - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/10/2016 Ramin Lalezari - Private

    Liked the project.

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    05/10/2016 Nai Yeat - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/10/2016 Jordan Cole - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/03/2016 Jason Dienhart - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/03/2016 Andrea Bollom - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/03/2016 Thomas Riley - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/03/2016 John Barnhart - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    05/03/2016 Andrea Bollom - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    05/02/2016 RUSSELL LIBBY - Physician

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Rina Amatya - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Jawad Khalifeh - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Julia Kolodziej - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Elaine Otchere - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Marianne Ligon - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Alexandra Keane - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Marianne Ligon - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Christopher Tricarico - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Kenneth Newcomer - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Ms. Erica Barnell - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Nicholas Spies - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Shraddha Kansagra - Pharmacist

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Julia Kolodziej - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Nicholas Spies - Medical Student

    Followed the project.

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    04/28/2016 Shraddha Kansagra - Pharmacist

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Rina Amatya - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/28/2016 Kenneth Newcomer - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/27/2016 Kavon Javaherian - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

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    04/27/2016 Paolo Dib - Medical Student

    Liked the project.

26

likes

13

Follows

0

Pilots

0

Partners

52

Interest
Score

2

Adoption
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Erica Barnell, B.S. (MD/PhD Student)
Medical Student
CEO
Washington University School of Medicine

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